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of the late steve jobs and a man who is defending the america's cup. i met with him last week at his home in woodside, california. >> america's cup wasn't racing the fast pest boats and we decided that the americas cup to capture the imagination of the modern world and children who can watch all of these other sports and participate, we had to modernize it, we had to make it exciting and extreme. >> rose: is there a cost of that have? >> i don't -- well, i think some people whoist withfully look back to the blue blazers and the brass buttons and the cute little ties with, you know, they'll miss the traditions of the america's cup which goes back to 1851. it's the oldest trowny sports. >> rose: larry ellison for the hour, next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: larry ellison is the founder and c.e.o. of oracle, the third-richest man of the united states said to be worth $43 billion. he's also the sponsor and manager of oracle team u.s.a., the american sailing name the 2013america's cup competition. next month in sa
in his book, i try to love america. but i cannot love things. no one in good health can. imagine a world of material wealth is devoid of people. i try to love america and its people, the dominant majority, their depiction of me and their treatment of mine. i have had to try to love america but they would not love the african whole of me. thus i could not love america. i have come to know that i have tried to love america's ideals and promise and process. these things could mean no more to me than they have to those that conceived them were written on were cited and ultimately betrayed them. then i stopped trying to love america. with that has come a measure of unexpected contentment that is settled upon me like an ancient ceremonial robe, warm and splendid, mislead but valued all the more for its belated retrieval. randall robinson, thank you for being with us. >> guest: thank you for having me. >> on this week's newsmakers, dana rohrabacher. he's chairman of the foreign affairs subcommittee on europe, eurasia, and emerging threats. we discussed a variety of foreign policy topics
is an only in america story and it is an amazing tale of entrepreneurship. you don't want to miss this. >>> then a big question that affects us all, for the first time in history, a majority of human beings now live in cities. what does that mean? more skyscrapers and congestion? more detroit? we'll look at the upsides and the down sides of an ever more urban world. we've got a terrific battle that has some surprising ideas. >>> also, "les miserables." it turns out that the book by victor hugo is the all-time favorite novel of a middle eastern leader that the west counts as an enemy. i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. we are watching a season of discontent in a world of young democracies, from egypt to turkey to brazil. protest marches and one coup. as we watched the turbulence around the world, i think about our own democratic journey and how interesting it is that the distinctive feature of the american system is not how democratic it is, but rather, how undemocratic it is. hear me out -- we have three co-equal branches of government. and the one with the final say on man
talked to him on the program in depth. this is three hours. >> host: what does america owe blacks? >> guest: well, it owes them an acknowledgment of what happened. we don't like to talk about that in the states. even blast history month. there's a truncated version of what woodson had in mind. now it starts in slavely and moves forward and cuts us all from any access to african history. which was not what woodson intended. and so we obviously owe the value of our hire to those people who suffered so much and their families who dissented from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owe them something for that. we owe them the story. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good sound, psychology health. ashes and obliterated history. when i was a dmield richmond, virginia, we used to have a phrase that we used all the time from here to tim. but nobody knew what it was. nobody knew the providence of the world. didn't know where it was. didn't know it was a place. tim buck, which was a cross roads. it was also a site of one the world's first university. a
the news to your money real. jazeera america. >> i'm kim bondy, growing up in news was always important. you have this great product that you are ready to share with the country. i'm a part of a team that is moving in the same direction. content while setting new standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> technology is coming on in the next few decades may make nuclear waste obsolete. we should all hope that's the case. but right now the international atomic energy agency expects the united states alone to produce at least 32,000 tons added to the pile. my next guess has made a documentary about the nuclear waste time will will air on al jazeera. if the problem can't be solved by new technology. it's directed by michael madsen who we will see in this clip explaining what it's all about. >> i am now in this place where you should never come
transformed america. she lives in williamstown, massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, she's a great friend of the library and me as well, but james mcgreggor burns is the dean of scholars writing the first two full editions of radio vet's biography yearings ago, and he's watching the prasm later. we want to send the best to him in massachusetts. [applause] with that, pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] have you seen "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of al fred hitchcock or joel mccia, but you may know them. "foreign correspondent" debuted in the summer of 1940, and in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question, what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis, says the reporter, played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that, well, to tell you the truth, i've not begin it much thought. you don't keep up with the foreign news, do you? well how would you li
to the scientists and allowed america to take the lead and develop the atomic bomb. by the time the bombs were dropped on hiroshima and nagasaki the british role in all of this have been completely forgotten. the sad part of the story is later in his life churchill who was kind of dismissed with nuclear technology throughout his career as a politician suddenly becomes aware of how destructive and how dangerous it is existentially. he only had that realization 20 years earlier it would have reshaped what became a nuclear arms locally. at the time i think he was just really unaware of the potentiality of atomic energy and dismissed it and kept saying i'm very happy with explosives we are to have. >> lara heimert a lot of the conversation here at bookexpo america this year is about e-books still. does basic have been approached to e-books? have they been helpful to your business? >> we love e-books. we love it when people have more ways to read books and what we find is a lot of people toggle between the two. they don't become exclusive e-book readers and don't assert their bookshelves. i use my
the way he saw america's potential relationship with all these middle east countries the word is reciprocity. he believed these countries should receive something in return. it wasn't good enough for the united states to function like a european colonial power and extract the resources of these countries and those countries receive nothing in return. this was alarming and disturbing to winston churchill and the british because the british had behaved in the middle east in a way that was exclusively extracted without those countries receiving much. occasionally a small number of countries receive something in return but president roosevelt had a more universal idea of reciprocity. look at saudi arabia. in saudi arabia the american oil companies were at that time by and large dividing the proceeds of the oil extraction 50/50. this was not occurring with the oil company in iran or the iraqi petroleum company which was largely dominated by the british in iraq so the british fought the american involvement in the middle east if the americans were going to use saudi arabia as a mode
: race, slavery and the troubled history of america's universities." we wrap up tonight's prime time programming at 11 p.m. eastern with the biography of charles manson. .. thank you very much for that lovely introduction. i suspect all of you know this but ladies and gentlemen, tonight you will be in the presence of a literary giant. among latin american giants, gabriel marquez is known for mesmerizing, others educate, and captivate, and then there is eduardo galeano. truth teller, galvanize her, firebrand, a writer who tells us about history, that those who inhabit the corridors of power don't want us to know more truly understand. eduardo galeano was born a commentator, it seems. by the time he was 14 he was publishing cartoons in newspapers. by 20 he was the editor of the left-wing weekly newsletter, he became the top executive of a paper of record. in 1971 at the tender age of 31 he published day hair raising indictment of north american influence on the hemisphere. the open veins of latin america. four years ago at the summit of the americas, hugo chavez hand and a copy of that
sought to pursue taking america into the second world war. and as michael explained, that changed the course of history as we know in very dramatic ways and in particular the role of america in very dramatic ways. and so the story is a fascinating one of itself. it's told beautifully by michael in a way that takes you into the rooms where the decisions were being made and the conversations were being had that shaped the course of history. but it also has i think important lessons about statecraft, about the way in which presidents of with great difficulty nevertheless can turn the american state and new and profoundly important directions. therefore it has relevance for today as well. michael was the director of the institute for international policy in sydney australia where he does a great job of leading that institution, which has become under his leadership the premier think tank on international policy and australia. as i said, she was formerly year as a senior fellow in the foreign policy program. he previously directed the global issues program at the institute and before t
with pulitzer prize winning author james mcgreger burns of the three roosevelt leader who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog roosevelt. and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note, for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and me as well. james mcgrayinger burns is the roosevelt scholar. he wrote the first volume of biography. he's in williamstown, massachusetts, and will be watching the program later. we want to send our best to him in williamstown, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce sue san dunn. -- susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place. have you ever seen alfred hitchcock's movie "foreign correspondent"? it made the debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks him flip what is your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis said the reporter played by joel. i'm referring to the war, mr. jones. oh, that. well to tell you the truth, i haven't given it much thought. you don'
muhamed who had sworn to love this as an immigrant and army sergeant enlistee to america looks at him and says i love bin laden. i don't need a wad to attack america. i've ex-met number of sleepers that i kid activate. as matthew and he walks out of the restaurant. he said that's the most dangerous man i've ever met and we cannot leave him on the street and yet they left him on the street for x. max number of months. the bombs go off in africa 200 some dead in and they wait a month. they finally arrest him and when they go to rest and guess what they do click they get them in a motel room in new york and they let him go to the bathroom. police 101. for anyone who has ever worked csi miami or dragnet noses as soon as you put the cuffs on somebody you search them or whatever. before they put the cuffs on them they let him go to the bathroom and he later admitted that he flushed key and permission down the toilet including alza were he's location the number two guy in al qaeda and guess what happened to ali muhamed? he is a john doe warrant for weeks and months because they don't want th
is elected with the duty to protect the national security interest of the united states of america and the decision he makes about the decisions that he makes about our foreign policy is with our national security interest front and center. >> now, the white house national security staff put out a statement this evening saying the president will continue to consult with u.s. allies but there is no mention the u.s. will go along with international partners. the next step comes when administration releases it's intelligence report on the chemical weapons attack to the public. the white house has hinted the president may make another statement on syria and presumably a window for action opens up this weekend when u.n. inspectors are scheduled to leave syria, but the u.s. appears to be ready to move before any further action at the ump u.n. they want to send a signal not just to syria but the world about the use of chemical weapons, piers. >> thanks very much, indeed. joining me now is senator john mccain. senator, thank you for joining me. why are you so credit kill of the president's
-author with james mcgregor burns of the three leaders who transformed america. she lives in massachusetts with jim burns and their dog, roosevelt, and i know that -- [laughter] just on a personal note for one thing, susan is a great friend of the library and of me as well, but james mcgregor burns is the dean of roosevelt scholars writing the first two biographies many, many years ago, and he's back in williamstown, massachusetts, and he'll be watching the program later, so we want to send best to him and william penn, massachusetts. [applause] so with that, i'm pleased to introduce susan dunn. [applause] >> thank you, bob. it's a great treat and great privilege to be speaking in this magical place of hyde park. have you ever seen alfred hitchkoch's movie, "foreign correspondence" starring herbert marshall? many of the students have not heard of these -- [laughter] but you may know them. it made a debut in the summer of 1940. in the first scene, a newspaper editor asks his lackadaisical reporter, johnny jones, a question. what's your opinion of the present european crisis, mr. jones? what crisis s
jazeera america, a new voice in american journalism. introduces america tonight. >> in egypt police fired tear gas -- >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. >> they risk never returning to the united states. >> we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. ♪ >>> welcome back everyone, as president obama tries to ratchet up support for his economic policies he is targeting a key constituency focused on the soaring cost of higher education. david shuster has the report. [ cheers ] >> at the university of buffalo, the president announced ambitious changes to make colleges more affordable and accountable for their costs. >> college has never been more expensive. over the past three decades, the average tuition at a public, four-year college has gone up by more than 250%. >
at where america lost its way could use this town as a primary source. go to cnn.com/fareed for a link to my "washington post" column this week, and let's get started. >>> when the rungs on the ladder of opportunity grow farther and farther apart, it undermines the very essence of america. that idea that if you work hard, you can make it here. >> that was president obama last week. in fact one thing that both right and left agree on is that social and economic mobility, bowing able to make it no matter where you start from, is at the heart of the american dream. in recent years the most depressing statistics about this country have been that that mobility has declined, particularly compared with other countries, despite the anecdotes and celebrated examples, most americans appear to be stuck in the economic strata into which they were born. last week the most detailed study on this topic was released. it provides lots of fascinating clo clues about the causes of our problem, breaking american mobility down by geography. for example, if you were born in a detroit family in the bottom fi
lyons recounts the introduction of the enlightenment to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its development. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. [laughter] that's always good to hear a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, my wife and i have only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we're based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and i'll probably always miss, and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book and most of my three earlier books as well. but i know that quality of life and the quality of discourse, particularly civic discourse, will be greatly improved. [laughter] and i know, also, that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that i'm speaking here tonight, and he would commend this institution on its civic-mindedness. franklin was known as a projector, that is he loves social projects, and
at this point in time in america. >> she is not political, she is not speaking out politically the way that abigail did with her husband. she is not a public political figure speaking out on these things. she has her own private views on some things. her views on politics are more about how people behaved. she is much more interested in everyone conducting themselves properly. even people on her own side. she doesn't like it when people who support the policies that her husband supported have crossed a line in terms of decorum. she is not trying to get out -- she's not an activist. i would not want to say that. >> nearly 100 years until women have the right to vote, we should point out for our younger viewers. what role could they play? where did their power come from? >> there is a coda to this story. just as john quincy became more and more outspoken in his opposition to slavery, and famously played a role in the amistad case. there was something between louisa and the green key sisters, who were pioneering activists and abolitionists of their day. i think she comes as close there as
to america and the role that benjamin franklin played in its develop and. this is a little over one hour. >> thank you for those kind words. i'd forgotten about some of that stuff. it's always good to get a refresher course. it's really wonderful to be here in seattle. as i mentioned to some of you when i first arrived, i wife and i only recently relocated to the pacific northwest. we are based out of portland, oregon, having left washington, d.c., the other washington. there is one institution i miss and that's the library of congress where i wrote this book, most of my three or their books as well. but i know the lord of life and quality of discourse will be greatly improved. and i know also that benjamin franklin would be particularly pleased to know that if speaking here tonight and that he would commend this institution on its civic mindedness. franklin was what was known as a projector. he loves -- loud projects, social projects. knowledge was a social activity and that was exemplified by the program get here at town hall. i do have to say one thing. i think he would probably frown
in size. one of america's most popular national parks is in threat. >>> san diego's mayor may step down tomorrow. >>> and a sinkhole drains water right out of the bayou. now a lawsuit is in the works. ♪ >>> more international outrage tonight over allegations of chemical weapons attack in syria. now it is willing reported that not only were runs killed but emergency responders who helped the victims died too. here is what we know right now. president obama has directed the u.s. intelligence community to quickly gather information about the alleged use of chemical weapons. the u.s. state department says syrian rebels do not have the means for chemical war fair. but the government is denying it used any toxic weapons. we want to warn you the video we are about to show you is graphic. we cannot independently verify that -- john what are you hearing from the un. >> we are hearing from officials all over the world today. but all of them keen to couch their words very carefully because as william hague said today this remains unkw unkwap -- uncooperated evidence. . -- let's hear from two lea
, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts. [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> president obama has unveiled a new plan to help cut the cost of college. he wants to use a rating system that judges schools on their affordable. colleges are kept tall abou skee plan and are worried it will cost their in
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for sony pictures, classic, now presenting "lou jasmine"- blue and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use her expertise. we offer expertise and a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. president obama says the alleged chemical attack in syria is a big event of grave concern but the british take it a step further. course we do believe that this is a chemical attack by the assad regime on a large scale. >> 40 people are killed and hundreds wounded after two car explosions ripped through the lebanese city of tripoli. one photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, tha
>> this is "bbc world news america" reporting from washington. president obama says the alleged chemical attack in syria is a big event of grave concern but the british take it a step further. course we do believe that this is a chemical attack by the assad regime on a large scale. >> 40 people are killed and hundreds wounded after two car explosions ripped through the lebanese city of tripoli. one photographer shows us the many ways in which martin luther king is portrayed across the u.s.. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and all and around the globe. a big event of grave concern, that is how president obama has described the alleged chemical attack outside of damascus earlier this week. the british foreign secretary has said in no uncertain terms that his government leaves that syrian regime attacked its own people. even russia has joined calls for leading you when inspectors investigate. letting you when .nvestigators in >> treating the injured from the alleged chemical attack in the damascus suburbs. adults and children, frantic medical workers. still u
almost quite obviously referred to in that interview, if america's core national interests are at stake? >> let me go to paul, who is in capitol hill, and paul, of course, many members of congress back home on recess that's why they have this conference call, have you heard anything tonight? >> well, that's right. there is mounting frustration what we are hearing. mounting bipartisan frustration, they are worried that any attack can draw the u.s. further into the syrian conflict. and they are also frustrated about the lack of an end game. about a clear policy for a way out. >> paul, do we know anything about the briefing at the white house that they had with congress? have you hear anything about that. >> they have heard there are problems with that video conference. a problem securing enough video conference lines so the conference had to be declassified on ur classified report. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or even changes the civil war. they are trying to keep it out of the hands of terrorists. >> we know the ashad regime maintains stock piles. we have indicated o
extinction. >> aljazeera turns to sports. components of the aljazz mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> we have been talking about syria all morning, but we have some developing news coming out of egypt. protests in support of ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi are taking plagues in the country. police have closed entrances into cairo and shut down metro stations in tahrir square to contain the protestors. flash style protests are being held in order to avoid fighting with police. >> eight years ago, hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast. more than 1800 people died in one of the worst natural disasters in this nations history. the city is still recovering. some very creative people have gone to the big easy to help drive its revival. >> he's come a long way since helping his father fix up houses in vermont. he's a respe
bugging, the united nations? a new report says america's spy agency, the nsa, targeted u.n. headquarters. in minutes, what the latest allegations against the nsa could mean for washington and our allies. and when you run with the bulls, you want to dodge the horns. but there's another danger lurking in america's newest past time, the drones over the sand. no really, you have to watch out for those, too, apparently. i am harris faulkner. the pope, leader of one billion catholics around the world has spoken about syria. as you know, world governments, including our own, are pondering what to do about the civil war in syria creating millions of refugees, putting pressure on neighboring muslim countries and potentially punching holes in an already fragile imbalance there. it could be the opening for terrorists to capitalize on the chaos in syria. aside from the wrangling by the politicians and diplomats, today, pope francis called for action, urging the international community to step up efforts to help syria end the war. the pope addressed tens of thousands of worshippers in st. peter's squ
it be in america there was a sting. now that you understand you have more of a dialogue. realistically we stopped talking to our young people. hopefully it open to dialogue to take time and talk to her children. and listen to them and start by saying something like hello or giving a smile. i always say on a personal note it's an eye-opener and something we need to continue to try to embrace in our children and our community because it starts with us. thank you. >> thank you very much. >> i just want to say that that synergy i spoke of having all these organizations and these institutions all have to work together. i think that is key and perhaps your organization could be the one that starts the ball rolling and starts the communication but i think that does have to happen. >> as long as we can get some cards from you and you could give us some support that would be great. >> if i could add to that quickly also. one common thread through all of our work is we look to history and different kinds of history to find instances of structural oppression, the structural violence and racism and responses
was an intern at bank of america in london, worked eight all-nighers in two weeks. we have more. >> the signs were there, but for the student, it was too late. the young student from germany was nearing the end of his internship at bank of america's investment on merle lunch when he died at his home. he had reportedly just worked 72 hours when he collapsed in the shower. his profile on a social media website had an ambitious streak, a pressure to outdo a fellow worker for a position. >> those individuals are so driven, so key to get a job, that they push themselves and in the end, push themselves over the edge. it's up to the leader of the team to see what's happening and even if these individuals keep volunteering for work, which some of them will do, to turn around and say no, you've done enough, you node to go and have some rest. >> an internship at a high pro tile company is seen as a valuable recruitment doing, putting pressure on interns to accel. many say interns do work punishing schedules in the banking industry, offering a glimpse of what's to item if they gain employment in the pro
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
security fellow with new america foundation, thank you so much for joining us this morning. as the quest considers how to respond, disturbing new images. this is video of what is said to be a fire bomb attack near a school in the northwestern part of syria. it may have contained may palm that sticks to the skin and causes severe burns. a doctor says at least seven people were killed and dozens were injuries. al jazeera cannot independently confirm those reports. >> asaad's regime has plameed the august 21st chemical attack on rebels. on friday, the syrian government called the u.s. intelligence on the use of chemical weapons fabrication and lies. keep it here to al jazeera for continuing coverage on the crisis in syria, you can also stay up to date on our website aljazeera.com. children in unmarked graves may finally have their stories told. exhume makeses are underway in an attempt to uncover their long held secrets. beautiful weather in yosemite national park, we will tell you why that sunshine is not helping firefighters dealing with a run away wild fire burning the national treasure.
will be first premier abroad. >> like most newcomers early japanese came to america full of hope. >> reporter: 340,000 japanese went to america before the second world war. many worked on farms but laws prohibited them from owning land or even becoming american citizens. >> go home, go home! >> reporter: he lived in seattle with his parents and brothers. the u.s. entered the war in 1941 after japan attacked pearl harbor. the government sent 120,000 japanese americans to internment camp in deserts and swamps. hisamil was among them. he was 10. >> we were imprisoned by barb wires and armed guard watch towers and so we lost our freedom. >> reporter: after the war, the japanese americans were released. many of them found it difficult to talk about the war. they chose to be silent. it was he from the third generation that broke the silence. the civil rights movement which started in the late '50s, prompted the younger generation to speak out. >> we will have no more of this silence! >> the silence is broken. >> the silence is broken. >> reporter: finally in the 1980s, a congressional commission fo
and what they did that they have not been able to do this two years. >> good morning, topping "america's money," traders hope today wall street will end the losing streak after the 6th straight day in the red shedding 100 points and slipped 4.5 percent from the record high on august 2. there is a surprising new survey of what happens to wedding gifts you give: 82 percent admit to selling some of the >> covering novato, oakland, sunnyvale and all the bay area, this is abc7 news. >> at 4:41 we look at the roof camera and you can see the ferry building to the left with all the weather details coming up. >> animal control will schedule a hearing next week to decide the fate of two pit bulls that attacked a 10-year old in antioch. friends and family and people who don't know hunter came out to raise money for his medical bills at a restaurant last night. they say the boy is doing well and recovering. one of the dogs that mauled hunter while plague at a neighbor's house was supposed to be put down yesterday but that didn't happen after the owners requested a hearing. that news was a let down
. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. [♪ music ] >> it's good to have you with us. here is a look at the top stories from around the world. japanese nuclear officials have visited the fukushima power plant to inspect a tank that is thought to be leaking radioactive water. officials at the plant have admitted that 300 tons of water has leaked from the facility. >>> i didn't want's deposed president hosni mubarak is in the hospital after being released from prison. there are large protests planned after friday prayers. >>> and chemical weapons used in syria could be seen as crimes against civilians innage alleged gas attack. >>> the number of children who are fled the war has now reached a million. ten thousand children have crossed into northern iraq. the region has become the largest growing refugee camp in the world. we're in northern iraq where many syrians have found refuge. tell us about the conditions th
to one person. it belongs to the people of america and i think whoever lives in it should preserve its tradition and enhance it and leave something of themselves there. next on booktv author susan crawford talks about her book "captive audience" the telecom industry and monopoly power in the new gilded age. she argues that america's economic future could be threatened by other countries that have internet capabilities that are faster and cheaper. author andrew blum hosts this hour-long discussion. >> host: thank you for being here and thank you for doing this. >> guest: i've been looking forward to talking to you. >> host: what is the status of rock band in america today? >> guest: well we have a picture that is quite different than the other developed nations. we have got very high download speeds in america cable and local monopolies in each region of the country that dominate that market and sell for 85% of americans their only choice where they live is going to be their local cable monopoly. we don't have any of the fastest 25 cities in the world when it comes to internet access in
america's credibility, deter the future use of chemical weapons and, critically, be a part of our broader policy and strategy. in the senate republican john mccain said now is the time for more and better weapons to be sent to the rebels. the top republican on the arms services committee said he cannot support a strike without more information about costs and purpose. more than 100 lawmakers in the house from both parties have told president obama he must come to them to seek congressional authorization before launching a strike. >> major garrett, thanks. this morning, the u.n. secretary-general asked the west to wait until his weapons inspectors have finished looking for proof of a chemical attack. holly williams is at the turkey/syria border. holly, good morning to you. >> good morning, anthony and gayle. here on the syrian border most of the syrian refugees we've spoken to would welcome u.s. strikes against the regime. many of them have been fighting against the government in the country's civil war. inside syria, there are many people who still support th
a look at this, it's america's largest ever rocket. it blasted off from california yesterday, overnight, i think. the delta 4 rocket, 23 stories high. the blast could be heard and felt for miles. it is a top secret mission. and don't know what it's all about. we told you to fill up your gas tank before goes is going up. we told you yesterday or the day before. we were right. we'll get a prediction from the gas buddy next. how high is it going? also, the ceo of ford, alan mulally. i will guarantee he's smiling. he's here to talk about building the ford fusion in the united states. come on, alan. america loves that ford f-150, do doesn't it? that's the moneymaker. he's relentlessly upbeat. you'll see him. ♪ one piece at a time and wouldn't cost me a dime♪ ♪ you'll know it's me when i come through your town♪ >> that's a good one. [laughter] well, let's change the subject briefly. ford is building the fusion here in america. can they make money selling what they call a mid-sized car? hold on a second. ford's chief alan mulally is going to be here in just a couple of minutes. let's
in the world. it is also profoundly about who we are. we are the united states of america. we are the country that has tried not always successfully but always tried to honor a set of universal values around which we have organized our lives and our aspirations. >> he went on to say the president said in syria will dictate how future regimes treat their people. as of right now president obama says no final decision has been made. >> i have said before and i meant what i said. the world has a nomination to make sure that we maintain the norm against the use of chemical weapons. i have not made a final decision about various actions that might be taken to help enforce that norm. >> a new poll says 80% of americans believe that president obama should seek congressional approval before making decisions on whether or not to enter been. dennis kucinich tweeted -- also the obama administration released document supporting allegations that the regime was responsible for the chemical attack that killed 1400 29 civilians including 426 children. that same attack sickened over 3600 people. i spoke with t
>>> good morning, america. breaking right now. boardwalk chaos. a lovely saturday evening in venice beach, california, shattered when a driver plows into the crowd. >> that guy's intention was to kill people. >> from russia with hate. madonna and lady gaga now in the crosshairs of the same official behind the country's controversial new anti-gay law. could the material girl and mother monster actually be prosecuted. >> hell hath no furry. a woman in court for murder for hire charges. >>> the man eating fresh water monster lurking in the louisiana bay bayou. we're kicking off shark week here on "gma" just when you thought it was safe to get in the water. >>> hey, good morning, everybody. we've also got breaking sports news about the fate of superstar alex rodriguez. our colleagues over at espn are reporting that major league baseball will suspend a-rod tomorrow. it's not a lifetime ban, but it is big and ron will have the details on that coming up. >> the league's highest paid player was determined he was coming back to the yankees. >>> also, this is a day of high anxiety for america
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
with his sense on however america has come and the work that has been left. ç] >> i have a dream. that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. let freedom ring. >> who can forget those words, those words changed a nation 50 years ago today and the message is one that lives on. take a look back now at that message and what really was the mission behind it. in 1963, dr. martin luther king, jr. was arrested and put in jail in birmingham, alabama, the charge, protesting without a permit. there he writes the famous letter from the birmingham jail that was the moral duty to break unjust laws that images of brutality of broadcast around the world, gaining sympathy thought civil rights movement. naacp field operator medgar evers is murdered outside his home. dr. king gives the speech, that famous i have a dream speech. on july 2, 1964, president johnson signs the civil rights act of 1964, which was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. late
. >> reporter: have you and follow rebels damaged the special relationship with america? >> i think the special relationship is extremely strong. it will endure then , episode and people will find it refreshing that from time to time britain can stand up to the united states and say we are friends with you but on a candid basis and disagree with you on this issue. we are still friends and have a special relationship but not going to agree on everything. >> reporter: phillip conservative mp talking to me in westminster and thank you very much and back to you in doha. >> reporter: thank you for that, let's cross to paris and speak to jackie and the no votes we saw in the uk jackie, does that change france's will or decisions to act militarily on syria? >> well, not if you look at what the president has said and speaking to the newspaper on friday and he said the britain is a sovereign country and every right to take its own decisions but made it clear france would take the decisions and later on friday he will be having an in depth discussion on the phone with barack obama to talk about the way
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